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Phil Skinner

Check out Phil's kit reviews - click here

Power Bronze Belly Pan

£49.50 (£64.50 Ė Carbon Look, £104.50 Ė Colour Matched)

Written by Phil Skinner.

Belly pan

Tools

Assembly

Fitting

Summary

Tools
A few of basic tools were needed to fit the belly pan. A small cross-head and medium flat head screw drivers, 12mm socket and torque wrench, a 4mm hex wrench, hacksaw and smooth file. It would also be a good idea to have some copper grease, thread-locking compound, heat reflective foil and some black enamel paint.

Out of the box the belly pan sat well forward of the header pipes, just clear of the front wheel, so a bit of fettling was required to get the belly pan to fit to my satisfaction. A retainer for one of the overflow pipes on the right and the side stand on the left prevented the rear brackets from being moved further back, hence the appearance of a hack saw in the tool list. I tried flipping the brackets round to face forwards but that wasnít much cop either. Remember, itís possible that even if you buy a belly pan from Power Bronze for your CB SevenFifty there may be slight differences. Make sure you know exactly what youíre doing before you start, and especially before you reach for the hacksaw. If in doubt take it to a mechanic.

Assembly
This first part is simple, three nylon screws and nuts hold the front panel to the main body. Use the small X-head screwdriver to tighten these. The nylon nut will take a bite so a spanner shouldnít be necessary. Take care not to over tighten and strip the threads, nylon fittings arenít so prone to slackening but a drop of a thread locking compound wouldnít go amiss. At this stage the rear brackets can also be attached to the body - the brackets pointing to the rear - using the 4mm hex head fasteners provided, remember to leave them finger tight for fitting.

Fitting
The two forward brackets (left and right) are held by the bottom bolt (12mm) of the upper engine mount, remember to leave them slack to allow adjustment. On my bike they sit near 10° from the vertical (bottom of bracket to rear of bike). The two jubilee clips are loosely attached to either side of the frame to the front of the aforementioned obstructions.

The belly pan can now be attached - finger tight - to the brackets using the remaining 4mm hex fasteners. You can now position where you want the belly pan to sit, avoid contact between pipes and pan or the obvious will happen (high temperature steel against plastic?). If you have contact/near contact some heatproof self-adhesive foil would be a good idea. Make sure the brackets and belly pan are sitting evenly.

Ensure you have the right position for the jubilee clips and mark off how much you need to cut off the rear brackets. Check and double-check the bracket lengths, remove them from the belly pan then hacksaw and dressed up with a file. Put the rear brackets back on and re-attach to the bike, make sure everything is as it should be, make any necessary adjustments and completion is near. A little copper grease on the 4mm hex fasteners is a good idea and make sure everything is tightened properly (like all bike bits itís worth checking every now and then that theyíve stayed tight).

Lastly (and youíll notice I havenít gotten round to it), the brackets could do with a lick of black paint to blend them in with the frame.

Summary
Iím really pleased with the belly pan, Iíve always thought they looked great on otherwise naked bikes. While it does serve some purpose in keeping crud off a small portion of the bike, itís definitely more cosmetic than practical. The practical side is offset by access for cleaning; you really have to remove the pan to clean properly, though this is a pretty quick and simple task (just four 4mm fasteners). I kinda like it in black and the cost for colour matched just seemed too much, I am considering getting it painted locally but Iíve yet to check out costs.

Okay, it looks ace but what an arseing about to fit it and it would also be nice if Power Bronze supplied black brackets (Iím pretty sure all the Retroís have black frames???), but it does look ace, so a slightly begrudged 4 out of 5 spanners.



If you have any specific questions you can email me at
phils.hoose@ukgateway.net

Phils has done some in-depth product reviews of his riding gear.

Check them out...

FM F101Helmet | Swift Cabon-pro race gloves | CoolViZion visor inserts
Sirius Jeans | Tattoos | GSB Zoom Boots | Sportex Storm Gloves
Power Bronze Belly Pan


Phil Skinner